Thứ Tư, 21 tháng 9, 2016

City HR work not glamorous, but critical: column
Editor’s note: Following is part of a series of reports from city of Wausau department heads for Daily Herald Media readers.
A few decades ago my daughter said her third-grade teacher was looking for Career Day speakers. “Mom,” she asked, “what do you do?”
“I manage a public service human resources Department, honey.”
“So, what do you DO?”
Trying to explain in terms easily understood by a 9-year-old, “Well, I work with a team to make certain we find good people to hire to accomplish the work of the government. Once hired, I help make certain they are treated and paid fairly. I also negotiate and administer employee benefits and collective bargaining agreements, and make certain employees receive feedback and training necessary to succeed in their jobs. When an employee decides to leave the organization, I make certain there is a record of their contributions.”
Less than thrilled, she replied, “OK. I’ll go ask Dad!”
While not the most exciting or attractive job to some, value‐added processes facilitated by Human Resources are critical to the delivery of key services to the city of Wausau’s citizens. It is our job to work with the Human Resources Committee, a standing Common Council committee, to offer competitive wages, benefits and working conditions to attract and retain police officers, firefighters, street and water maintainers, customer service specialists, managers and professional staff along with a variety of other employees to do the important work of delivering governmental services and maintaining the city.
Within Public Safety, hiring and discipline is accomplished within the oversight of the Police and Fire Commission appointed by the mayor. A staff of three —HR Consultant Jennifer Kannenberg, Senior HR Consultant Elise Krohn and I — support employing a city staff of 327.
In 2014, HR ran recruitment and selection processes employing 56 people (31 regular and 20 temporary, seasonal staff). Faced with a $500,000 projected health insurance cost increase, the HR Team developed a fourth plan option that’s projected to build reserves by $125,000, all the while expanding preventive therapeutic prescription drug coverage, eye care coverage and providing an income-replacement program for employees unable to work due to illness or injury.
HR also administered a performance appraisal system with 100 percent of employees receiving annual feedback in support of a new pay‐for‐performance system. When employees failed to perform their jobs satisfactorily or follow the city’s work rules, HR coached managers in making corrections or applying discipline. In many instances, HR facilitates alternative dispute resolution to resolve workplace conflicts.
Myla Hite is director of human resources for the city of Wausau.
wausaudailyherald.com
City's human resource director testifies Tuesday in bench trial tied to suit from 10 former employees

By Ann Marie Bush
ann.bush @ cjonline.com

Jacque Russell, director of human resources for the city of Topeka, testified afternoon that despite difficult economic times in 2011, protecting city employees was important during the consolidation of the city parks and recreation department and the county’s department.

After calling three witnesses, the city of Topeka rested its case after 4 p.m during a bench trial at Shawnee County District Court.

Ten former Topeka parks and recreation employees are suing the city, contending they were involuntarily terminated from their employment with Parks and Recreation of Topeka on Dec. 31, 2011, then became Shawnee County employees the following day.

Attorney Grant Glenn filed a lawsuit against the city in May 2012 on behalf of former employees William Riphahn, Teri Simpson, David Specht, Clay Neal, Lynn Bishop, Bruce Andrews, Roger Wilcox, John Bell, Kathy Jo Huseman and Gena Brooks.

The 10 contend they should have received severance pay from the city.

A bench trial began at 10 a.m. Monday in front of Judge Rebecca Crotty.

John Knight, director of the merged parks and recreation department, and Terry Bertels, director of the parks department, also testified on Wednesday.

Most of the plaintiffs had testified on Tuesday and Wednesday. However, Glenn said one more of the plaintiffs will testify at 9 a.m. Thursday.

“There will be no closing arguments,” Crotty said after both sides agreed. “We’ll rely on the briefs.”

Shelly Starr, chief of litigation for the city of Topeka, spent more than hour questioning Russell about benefits the employees received in transitioning to the county. Fifty city employees were affected by the merger, Russell said. Two employees in the union, as well as two managers, opted not to transfer, she said.

Those who transferred were allowed to take their vacation time, some of their sick leave and senority with them, Russell testified. Employees who transferred also had the option to have be paid for some of their accrual hours.

Because the consolidation wasn’t addressed in the city’s personnel code, Russell “was blazing a new trail,” Starr said.

“The elephant in the room is ‘Why were these employees not paid severance?” Starr said.

Russell said severance is paid out when “you have suffered a job loss.” The city parks and recreation employees were guaranteed a similar job and the same rate of pay six months after the merger.

“Do you feel you were responsive to employees who asked questions?” Starr asked Russell.

“Yes,” Russell replied.

“Were you trying to hoodwink them?” Starr asked the witness.

“Not at all,” Russell told the court.

The petition alleges the city:

■ Failed to comply with its personnel code requirement that the city offer severance benefits to employees who have lost their jobs “through no fault of their own” as part of a “permanent reduction in force.”

■ Negligently misled the 10 into signing a waiver releasing their rights under the city personnel code.

■ Violated the Kansas Wage Payment Act by failing to offer the employees severance pay.

cjonline.com/news

Thứ Sáu, 29 tháng 7, 2016

Lying in the hiring process: What human resources needs to know


 People lie all the time during the hiring process. It’s up to Human Resources and hiring managers to catch those liars. Where are those fibs being told — and how can you prevent them?
human resoureces learn to catch those liars

 

Resume lies


In this intense job market, it’s no surprise that many applicants exaggerate parts of their resumes to look more enticing to potential employers.
The concept is so widespread, however, that nearly half of all applicants admit to lying on their resumes.
That’s according to a 2009 study from ADP, which found that 46% of all applicants commit some form of resume fraud.
Where are those lies being concentrated? Here are the 10 most common lies on resumes, courtesy of Marquet International:
  1. Stretching work dates
  2. Inflating past accomplishments and skills
  3. Enhancing job titles and responsibilities
  4. Exaggerating educational background
  5. Inventing periods of “self-employment” to cover up unemployment
  6. Omitting past employment
  7. Faking credentials
  8. Falsifying reasons for leaving prior employment
  9. Providing false references, and
  10. Misrepresenting a military record.

Interviewing lies


Your job would be a lot easier if you could easily spot those resume lies and nix those candidates from consideration.

But no matter how clued in you are to what applicants fib about, you’ll still inadvertently bring many of them in for interviews.

That’s when your skills at judging character come in. So who’s the best at screening potential talent? Is it someone who’s skeptical and suspicious about most applicants, or a person who’s trusting?

If you guessed that skeptical managers would do a better job, you’re not alone. You’re also wrong.

That’s according to a recent study from psychologists Nancy Carter and Mark Weber, which was recently highlighted in The Washington Post.

A large majority (85%) of participants said a skeptical interviewer would do a better job spotting dishonesty in job interviews.

But a subsequent study found that people who trust others — or who assume the best in other people — are the best at identifying liars.

How’s this so? On human resources expert explains:

… Lie-detection skills cause people to become more trusting. If you’re good at spotting lies, you need to worry less about being deceived by others, because you can often catch them in the act.

Another possibility: People who trust others become better at reading other people because they get to see a range of emotions during their interactions. That gives them more experiences to draw from to tell when someone is lying and when someone is telling the truth.

Human resources leaves employers with some advice on who they should have in the interviewer role to prevent applicants from duping you into hiring them:

Human resources expert - we need leaders who demonstrate skill in recognizing dishonesty. Instead of delegating these judgments to skeptics, it could be wiser to hand over the hiring interviews to those in your organization who tend to see the best in others. It’s the Samaritans who can smoke out the charlatans.
Of course, faith in others can go too far. It’s important to sprinkle a few ounces of skepticism into each pound of trust. Ultimately, while the best leaders don’t trust all of the people all of the time, the keenest judges of character may be the leaders who trust most of the people most of the time.
Source:http://www.Hrmorning.Com/

Fusing Human Resources and the Holy Scripture

By Brennan Smith

Robertson School of Government (RSG) professor Dr. Gary Roberts says his most recent book is a labor of love. His love of human resources and Scripture fused as he wrote his latest book about these topics. He has many years of experience as an HR professional, having earned a doctorate in the subject and having spent some time as a senior research analyst designing performance appraisal systems.

In 2003 when the Lord led him to Regent University to be a professor, that experience met face-to-face with a new concept, integrating faith in the workplace.

"I was learning as much as the students," said Roberts. "I would be reading about faith integration, your faith at work, Mike Zigarelli's reading and others."

That reading led Roberts to begin putting together short essays about faith integration, looking at Scripture and seeing what it has to say about a business topic.

"And so I had all of this material," said Roberts. "Sometimes it's easier to write out a book with a framework, but what I had to do was kind of piece together all of these kind of components."

"Christian Scripture and Human Resource Management: Building a Path to Servant Leadership through Faith" is one of four books Roberts has authored or co-authored. He shared some of his latest book's themes and stressed the importance of appreciating human resources Tuesday, interacting with guests in Robertson Hall.

"I spent a lot of time illustrating what servant leadership is, the character, the behavior attributes, and then the principles that define servant leadership in the HR world," said Roberts. "The book also illustrates the value of servant leadership empirically, the research that says if you're a servant leader, it has beneficial outcomes on your attitudes, behavior and performance."

Book chapters deal with hypocrisy, managing change, and specific HR topics like pay-roll recruiting and performance management.

"In those chapters I have specific examples and illustrations of how you implement the best of the secular with specific integration of Scripture and biblical examples," said Roberts.

Roberts is already working on his next book about spiritual intelligence in the workplace. It's another area he's both knowledgeable and passionate about as a professor in the RSG.

Regent.Edu

Thứ Tư, 27 tháng 7, 2016



Here are five tips to help college students, especially business majors, build their resume into an impressive showcase for future employers.

Today’s job market is tough; undergrads are facing more pressure than ever to set themselves apart from their competition. How do you set yourself apart from other graduates? Many college students believe that a good GPA and having some work experience automatically builds their resume and will impress prospective employers. With so much stiff competition, is that really enough? As a recruiter for Hajoca’s Management Training Program, resumes come across my desk every day, and I know what works and what doesn’t.

Here are five tips to help college students, especially business majors, build their resume into an impressive showcase for future employers.

1. Pick a major relevant to your field of interest. The first thing all college-bound students should do is pick a major that will prepare them for their post-collegiate life. Many students say they picked their major because it was a topic that sounded interesting, was easy for them, or seemed the most fun, only to realize after graduating that they were not prepared for the type of job they desired.

Work with your school counselor to figure out the best major for your desired career path.
Use your elective courses or take up a minor if you want to pursue some things outside of your career path; it will make you seem well rounded and can be a lot of fun.
If you are planning a career in business or plan to go to graduate school, you want to stick with majors like Business Administration, Leadership or International Business. This will ensure you don’t miss key classes that will shape your learning and add value to your resume.

2. Have an internship – and make it count. Working as an intern can be a great way to get your foot in the door at a company and gain some real-world experience. If you decide that an internship is right for you (or is required by your school), don’t just “get the job done;” work on relationship building with your co-workers and managers. Having recommendations from one solid internship experience will go much further than working multiple part-time jobs or having multiple internships.

Business is about building relationships, and you’ll quickly learn that making a good impression on your current boss could befit you for years – even decades – to come. If you realize you are in a heavily administrative internship, take on as many projects as you can – even if you aren’t assigned to do them. Showing initiative looks good to your employer, as well as on your resume.



3. Join clubs/organizations early on and take a leadership role. College can be overwhelming at first: moving away from home, new roommates, difficult classes, and college life in general can be very scary for incoming freshmen. Joining clubs or sports that interest you is a good way to meet friends and build your resume. Showing your commitment to a club or sports team is a great way to show off your dedication, motivation and leadership skills.If you join as a freshman or sophomore, you’ll have a better chance at being elected to a leadership role. Taking on a leadership role in a club or sport shows that you can lead a group, be responsible and have the ability to influence change.

4. Show off your technology skills. In today’s job market, knowing the Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) is not only necessary, but expected. Go one step further and get involved with creating a website, social media platform or an App. Employers look for students who know about technology and can use it to increase sales, bring in customers or update their systems. Feel technology challenged? Use Internet tutorials to learn a new skill, or ask a current Website moderator how you can contribute to their site.

5. Develop your personal brand. Your personal brand is the way others see you; it’s how you sell yourself to your potential employers. It’s more than just your resume; it’s your reputation, credibility and potential. Deciding early on to do the right thing, going above and beyond what is asked, and becoming the best person, friend, student and employee that you can be is the first step in developing your personal brand. Learn as much as you can from others: Talk to your fellow students, professors, work colleagues, friends and family. Always ask questions, but more importantly, listen. Learn when you can add value and when you can take away new understandings of ideas. Always live up to your potential and always do the right thing; this will put you on a path to success.

(Picture Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected
Deloitte: Time Right to Reinvent human resources Profession in Oil, Gas

The human resources (HR) profession can take advantage of Australia’s changing oil and gas marketplace to evolve and improve how it meets the demands of the industry, according to Julie Harrison, human capital partner at Deloitte Australia.

Ahead of the professional services company releasing its 2015 Global Human Capital Trends this month, Harrison provided an insight into the top five issues and challenges facing the Australian oil and gas industry:

- leadership
- culture engagement
- learning and development
- workforce on demand
- reinventing HR

Despite being fairly consistent with the trends of previous years the extent of how important each issue currently is has adjusted to reflect an Australian industry now in a transitional phase.



Major projects in the country’s booming liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry are largely moving from construction to operations, while significantly lower commodity prices have forced substantial labor and cost cutbacks at all levels.
Timely for HR Reinvention as Australia’s LNG Sector Moves into Operations

Harrison believes this has created an opportunity for reinvention from a human capital perspective as the growing importance of leadership, organizational culture, and learning and development come to the fore.

“The timing is right to really take a good look at HR and do some great work to reinvent it by making sure it is really focused on being part of the business strategy,” Harrison told Rigzone on the sidelines at the Australasian Oil & Gas (AOG) Exhibition & Conference in Perth this week.

“Looking at commodity prices you have to be really focused on the size, scope and scale of the HR function, and what is right for the business and the environment.

“This would really be a great thing for the HR function to be doing, to be on the front foot about it instead of being forced to do it by the business.”

Deloitte’s research for the report has involved surveys and interviews with more than 3,300 business and HR leaders from 106 countries, with oil and gas a prominent industry reviewed in Australia.

Deloitte Emphasize Need for HR Professionals to Broaden Skillsets

From the Australian findings Harrison said it was clear that HR professionals needed to broaden their skillsets to become a more valuable asset to help oil and gas companies overcome the challenges.

“Companies are needing absolute specialists from a HR perspective and need to make sure that their HR business partners are acting very much as strategic business partners,” Harrison explained.

“Are they acting as HR analysts or business partners that are really helping to drive and align the business strategy?

“There are organizations that do this well and there are some fairly senior HR people that do it well, but generally speaking most are still on the backfoot and seen in the main as service deliverers, as opposed to really coming into the 21st century and being proactive.”

Harrison added that HR professionals were being challenged to move beyond what was comfortable to adopt new skills, with improved knowledge of operational data and analytics a key focus area.

“They are actually really valuable skillsets in HR and will help them to be more aligned to where the business is going,” Harrison explained.

“Looking at the style of organizations in the oil and gas industry they still seem to be very engineer centric, and engineers love data in general, so it becomes how do we from a HR perspective become more comfortable with the idea of using data to make decisions, which is what organizations are really looking for.”

By effectively achieving this reinvention oil and gas companies would, of course, improve productivity and lower costs within the business, Harrison continued.



With Australia falling behind its counterparts in both areas Harrison expected development from HR in this area to help the local industry efficiently move into the operational phase of LNG and adjust to the current market environment.

“The whole idea of directing employee engagement is fundamentally important, as is understanding cost structures,” Harrison said.

“Negotiating different deals as you move from major capital projects to operations, with different employment contracts, you can actually reduce costs as opposed to the project related costs. Those directives are what we are starting to maintain to manage the costs associated with that.”

By Ben Creagh | Rigzone Contributor | rigzone.Com

Thứ Sáu, 20 tháng 3, 2015

Working With HR Clients From Hell? Here Are Two Quick Tips For Dealing With Them…

By Alan Collins | successinhr.Com/hr-clients-from-hell

On a few occasions, I’ve had the delightful privilege of working with the client from hell.

You know the type…

The client that doesn’t think HR can do anything right.
The client you dread getting telephone calls from.
The client, who when his or her name pops up on your phone, you feel like throwing up before answering the call.
The client that you lay awake the night before trying to figure out a way to avoid meeting with the next day.
The client that no matter what you do, no matter what HR heroics you pull off, will find something to beat you up for.

You feelin’ me?

As an HR professional, you’ll work with a lot of clients. Obviously, 95% of them will be terrific and won’t have horns or carry a pitchfork.

Here’s the point: One of the best things you’ll ever do for your HR career is to seek out and work with the Tonys of the world. There are lots of them out there — in all organizations, at all levels — from Warehouse Manager to CEO.

These clients are looking for great HR folks also. They want to partner with those who share and can help them realize their own visions for their organizations.

But make no mistake about it, clients like Tony are very demanding and won’t hesitate to kick you in the butt too…but in the process will also grow you, stretch you, challenge you, inspire you, nurture you and give you tough love along the way. And that’s what you want.

Now, having seen Tony, let’s get back to the original point of this article: What do you do to address clients from hell?  Two quick tips.

1. Avoid them in the first place.

When you’re interviewing for that new HR job, interview the company as hard as they are interviewing you. Ask insightful and tough questions to the business leader of the client group you’ll be supporting.

If the business leader or your main client is too busy to meet with you, that’s a big red flag.

And, again, a poor match will make your HR life a living hell. If you don’t know what to look for when interviewing your clients, it’s easy. You want to try and get as close to a Tony as you can.

2. If you’re already in a bad client relationship, start your exit strategy.

You want to pull the plug on this assignment ASAP. Your options: Transfer. Post for a new job. Have a candid discussion with your boss about another client or assignment. Leave the organization. Or offer to job swap with some other unsuspecting HR colleague (hey, just kidding!).

Either way, whatever you do, don’t fall in the trap of trying to fix this person. Research conducted by the Center For Creative Leadership reveals that trying to change your client is a waste of time – especially if they’ve been around awhile and their behavior has been tolerated. So stop wishing he or she will change and put your own needs first.

If your exit from this role is going to take some time, don’t be vindictive. Be patient and bide your time. Continue to give this jerk the same responsive, professional, value-added HR support that you always have. Just because you’re getting crapped on, is no excuse to return the favor.

However, don’t plan to stay in this role long. In volatile times with downsizing still occurring in many organizations, you never can tell how much weight this madman’s perceptions will be given in HR layoff decisions.

Let me be clear: the “personal development,” “character building” and the +5% compensation bribe…er, increase you might get to work with bad clients is overrated. It may sound great at the time, but isn’t worth it. Whatever you gain developmentally is offset by the hit you take to your HR reputation, your personal self-esteem and your mental sanity.

Life’s too short.

Avoid toxic clients at all costs.

You deserve better.

Onward!

Top 10 Ways to Find Your Career Path

If you're not sure which direction your career should go in, you're thinking about making a career change, or you just want to feel more fulfilled in your career, these ten tips might help.

Ideally, everyone would know their true calling early in life and find happiness in their work, but it often doesn't work that way. One survey (of New York professionals) found that they expected to change careers three times in their lifetimes; lifelong careers may not be the norm any more.

That said, we know there are better ways to choose a career than just following your parents' footsteps or choosing randomly. Here are some ideas.

10. Think About What Excites and Energizes You



This one's the first obvious step—we all want to enjoy and actually like our careers. (Perhaps the biggest sign you're on the wrong path is if you dread talking about your job.) While passion isn't the only requirement for being content in your career, many would say it's still essential, if only because passion is what keeps you going even through the tough times. Is there a job you would do job for free?

9. But Also Keep in Mind What You're Good At



Maybe you don't feel that passionate about any specific career—or you love multiple areas and can't decide on just one. Then it's time to think about your personality and focus on the skills you have. "Don't do what you love. Do what you are."

8. Take a Test



Well, you say, what if you don't know what you're good at or even what you're interested in? Career assessment tests in college or even high school help narrow down a field (perhaps with the Myers-Briggs personality index), but if it's been a while since you took those tests, there are other kinds of assessment tests you can take. This one from Rasmussen College matches your self-reported skills and interests with potential jobs. (And they also have a salary and job growth interactive chart.) For potential programmers, Switch recommends a coding career based on your preferences. About.Com's Job Search site has a collection of other career tests.

You can also find a career that fits your motivational focus with this assessment test.

7. Try an Internship



If you have flexibility when it comes to salary, an internship could be a great way to test out an industry or type of career—and eventually get a full-time job (especially if you have no prior experience). Even if it doesn't turn into a job or you find out it's the wrong career for you, an internship can help build your network—from which you can get career and job advice. (Not all internships are just about picking up coffee. For example, Google internships, while hard to come by, put you to real work.)

6. Find a Mentor



A mentor could help you take your career to the next level and give you the insider insight to help you make sure you're on the right path. Here's how to ask someone to be your mentor.

If there's a career you're interested in, you might also check to see if any companies or people in that line of work would let you shadow them for a few days to see what it's really like.

5. Explore Unconventional Careers



We all know the popular careers available to us—doctor, lawyer, teacher, computer engineer, police officer, store owner, etc. If you feel uninspired by the typical choices, know that there are thousands of unusual jobs you might not have heard about, hidden, perhaps, in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Handbook. Mashable has a list of six dream jobs that pay well (panda caretaker! Chocolate inspector!), Thought Catalog highlights 10 more (sex toy testers?!), and Chron lists a couple of others (along with related articles like "Unusual careers with animals" and "unusual accounting careers").

4. Ask Other People



Perhaps the best way to discover a new career is to ask other people about theirs—assuming you come into contact with people who don't all work in the same field. Your LinkedIn network (or other social media sites, but especially LinkedIn) might be a good place to start mining for information. Also, don't forget your local library's reference librarian can point you to career resources.

3. Use the G+P+V Formula



The perfect career for you would most likely fit the G+P+V formula, which stands for Gifts + Passions + Values. Consider your strengths and passions, as we've noted above, and your values—what's nonnegotiable about the way you work?

2. Make a Career Plan



As with most things, your career will benefit if you have goals and a plan for it. Maybe you think you want to be a writer, but the next step after that, is editing. (Do you really want to do that?) Or maybe you want to transition from being an editor to a restaurant owner. (How are you going to get there?) Map out where you want to go, with concrete milestones, as if it were a four-phase project.

1. See Your Career as a Set of Stepping Stones, Not a Linear Path



Of course, all these plans and ideas are never set in stone. Your career is a marathon, not a sprint and it can turn out to be a very winding road indeed, knitted together from all of your experiences into, hopefully, a career worth having.

Photos from VoodooDot (Shutterstock), OpenClips (Pixabay), Mopic (Shutterstock), sacks08, auremar (Shutterstock), Little Birth, bobsfever.

Lifehacker.Com

Thứ Hai, 29 tháng 12, 2014

Lying in the hiring process: What Human resources needs to know

 

 People lie all the time during the hiring process. It’s up to Human Resources and hiring managers to catch those liars. Where are those fibs being told — and how can you prevent them?

human resoureces learn to catch those liars

 

 

Resume lies

 

In this intense job market, it’s no surprise that many applicants exaggerate parts of their resumes to look more enticing to potential employers.

The concept is so widespread, however, that nearly half of all applicants admit to lying on their resumes.

That’s according to a 2009 study from ADP, which found that 46% of all applicants commit some form of resume fraud.

Where are those lies being concentrated? Here are the 10 most common lies on resumes, courtesy of Marquet International:

  1. Stretching work dates
  2. Inflating past accomplishments and skills
  3. Enhancing job titles and responsibilities
  4. Exaggerating educational background
  5. Inventing periods of “self-employment” to cover up unemployment
  6. Omitting past employment
  7. Faking credentials
  8. Falsifying reasons for leaving prior employment
  9. Providing false references, and
  10. Misrepresenting a military record.

 

Interviewing lies

 

Your job would be a lot easier if you could easily spot those resume lies and nix those candidates from consideration.

 

But no matter how clued in you are to what applicants fib about, you’ll still inadvertently bring many of them in for interviews.

 

That’s when your skills at judging character come in. So who’s the best at screening potential talent? Is it someone who’s skeptical and suspicious about most applicants, or a person who’s trusting?

 

If you guessed that skeptical managers would do a better job, you’re not alone. You’re also wrong.

 

That’s according to a recent study from psychologists Nancy Carter and Mark Weber, which was recently highlighted in The Washington Post.

 

A large majority (85%) of participants said a skeptical interviewer would do a better job spotting dishonesty in job interviews.

 

But a subsequent study found that people who trust others — or who assume the best in other people — are the best at identifying liars.

 

How’s this so? On human resources expert explains:

 

… Lie-detection skills cause people to become more trusting. If you’re good at spotting lies, you need to worry less about being deceived by others, because you can often catch them in the act.

 

Another possibility: People who trust others become better at reading other people because they get to see a range of emotions during their interactions. That gives them more experiences to draw from to tell when someone is lying and when someone is telling the truth.

 

Human resources leaves employers with some advice on who they should have in the interviewer role to prevent applicants from duping you into hiring them:

 

Human resources expert - we need leaders who demonstrate skill in recognizing dishonesty. Instead of delegating these judgments to skeptics, it could be wiser to hand over the hiring interviews to those in your organization who tend to see the best in others. It’s the Samaritans who can smoke out the charlatans.

Of course, faith in others can go too far. It’s important to sprinkle a few ounces of skepticism into each pound of trust. Ultimately, while the best leaders don’t trust all of the people all of the time, the keenest judges of character may be the leaders who trust most of the people most of the time.

Source:http://www.Hrmorning.Com/

 

Making a difference: Careers in child welfare

Today, child welfare workers are on the front lines of the fight to prevent child abuse, seeking a happy and healthy outcome for everyone in the family or community. Social workers, foster care specialists, case managers and child protective specialists are just some of the professionals working every day to make sure children live in well-adjusted and competent homes.



How to become a social worker
There are numerous career paths available for those who want to work in child protective services, and since abuse happens everywhere, any region or state may have openings. One of the most common routes to this profession is becoming a social worker.

Social workers work closely with children and their parents to help them cope with problems in their lives. Child and family social workers wear many hats -- they help parents find resources they need, step in when a child is being abused, arrange foster families or adoptions, and help families deal with a variety of issues, from mental illness to divorce.

Social workers must possess at least a bachelor's degree in social work or a related field to begin entry-level work. A bachelor's prepares graduates for direct-service positions, such as that of a case worker. To make sure certain students are ready for that responsibility, social work programs often require students to complete an internship or field work prior to graduation. Those who want to work in schools or health care typically need a master's degree. Clinical social workers must have both a master's and at least two years of supervised experience in order to move into private practice.

All states require social workers to be licensed, and there may be additional requirements for those who work in child welfare, depending on the state or local area. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for child and family social workers is projected to grow 15 percent nationwide from 2012 to 2022.

Other careers in child protective services
There are many other positions in the field of child welfare. A child protective specialist, for instance, responds to reports of abuse or neglect, conducting interviews and home visits to investigate the issue and then taking the appropriate actions to ensure the safety and well-being of the children in question. Family case managers oversee children who have been removed from the home and placed in a safer situation, all while working toward the goal of family reunification or successful adoption of the child. Access and initial assessment specialists take the initial reports concerning abuse or neglect, determine whether the child is in immediate danger and alert the appropriate authorities as needed.

There are also those who work in supporting roles, providing assistance or counseling services to parents, children and communities going through difficult times. Careers such as community health worker, family therapist, school counselor, social service assistant, behavioral counselor and rehabilitation specialist are just a few of the many possibilities for those who want to help alleviate the problems of child abuse and neglect.

The challenges and rewards of child welfare work
Those who work in child welfare face unique challenges. According to the Social Work Policy Institute, the emotional toll on child welfare workers can be very high, leading to quick burn-out and high turnover rates in the field. Caseloads are heavy, and the time required for the job often surpasses the usual 40-hour workweek. However, studies have shown that those well-trained for the job, especially those with higher degrees in social work, are more likely to stay with the profession for the long haul.

Despite the challenges, those who work in child welfare provide a very valuable service. The Child Welfare Information Gateway reports that 3.2 million children in 45 states received prevention services from a CPS agency in 2012 -- proof that there is a strong line of defense against child abuse and neglect.

And for those who what to join the fight, a career in child welfare can be a great way to make a difference in the community.

(Pictrure Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected

Thứ Hai, 8 tháng 9, 2014

QUIZ: Are you enthusiastic, or are you a kiss-up?

Some people are naturally more energetic, positive and enthusiastic than others, and then there are the people who channel those emotions and actions into advantageous relationships, also known as kiss-ups.

Do you use a lot of exclamation marks when you send an email?! Is the status report of every project you’re working on “Great!”? Do you have a handshake that could give whiplash to someone’s wrist if you’re not careful?

Some people are naturally more energetic, positive and enthusiastic than others, and then there are the people who channel those emotions and actions into advantageous relationships, also known as kiss-ups. While it’s fine to be a hard worker and bring your enthusiasm to the role, you risk your reputation and relationships with co-workers if your behavior more closely resembles manipulation, and nobody wins in that scenario. Avoid the drama and take this quiz to find out if you’re simply enthusiastic or acting like a kiss-up.



1. Have you ever brought in coffee or snacks for your boss?

A. Yes, but they were also for the department to enjoy.
B. No, that’s not part of my job.
C. Yes, every Monday morning I bring her favorite coffee and muffin from the café across town.

2. How often do you volunteer for the projects nobody wants?

A. I’ve stepped up and taken projects that weren’t my favorite -- but it felt good to get the work done.
B. Never…other people usually end up taking them and I’m fine with that.
C. As often as I can! I know my boss will notice and reward my efforts.

3. Who do you usually talk to at the office holiday party?

A. My co-workers, the boss, my co-workers’ guests, the cleaning staff, the caterers…
B. The same people I talk to at work and maybe their guests.
C. My boss and her husband, her boss, human resources and any other important power players.

4. Do you ever stay late or work weekends if there’s a bigger workload?

A. Sure! If the work can’t get done on normal hours, I don’t mind taking the extra time to do it right.
B. I’ve had to, but I wouldn’t volunteer my time if I could get the deadline moved to accommodate the workload.
C. One time I didn’t while my boss was on vacation, but most of the time I’m the first to volunteer to stay late.

5. Your boss made a major financial mistake and the department is in serious trouble. What do you do?

A. If the mistake can be fixed, I’ll try to help. Otherwise, there’s not much I can do.
B. Nothing -- it wasn’t my fault, right?
C. I confidentially tell my boss that I can take the blame for this mistake if it means I’ll be rewarded for my loyalty later.

Mostly A’s: You’re enthusiastic. The energy you bring to your job is contagious, and your co-workers are likely glad to have you around. From helping with unsavory projects to being social at company parties, you’re a strong member of the team and when you’re not around, people miss your presence. There’s never a quiet brainstorm session when you’re in attendance, and waiting at the microwave in the break room isn’t too awkward, thanks to your steady stream of conversation. All in all, your enthusiasm is a valuable asset to your career. Just make sure your emails aren’t solely punctuated by exclamation marks.

Mostly B’s: You’re a killjoy. You don’t need to have a smile on your face every day to do a good job at work, but your morose attitude isn’t doing you any favors. It doesn’t seem like you’re networking within your company or outside of it, and your refusal to lend an extra helping hand is likely preventing you from establishing new relationships or earning the trust of your co-workers. Remember that extra work and achievements are the way to move forward in your career, and the attitude that you have during those accomplishments is what sets you apart -- for better or for worse.

Mostly C’s: You’re a kiss-up. It’s great that you’re so eager to help a team member or be there to support your boss, but it’s clear that you’re out for the approval of upper management instead of letting your achievements speak for themselves. In fact, what achievements do you have? If you’re more memorable for always standing in the boss’s shadow than for the successful project you headed last quarter, it’s time to rethink your priorities and establish a game plan that puts you and your hard work front and center.

(Picture Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected

Working With HR Clients From Hell? Here Are Two Quick Tips For Dealing With Them…

By Alan Collins | successinhr.Com/hr-clients-from-hell

On a few occasions, I’ve had the delightful privilege of working with the client from hell.

You know the type…

The client that doesn’t think HR can do anything right.
The client you dread getting telephone calls from.
The client, who when his or her name pops up on your phone, you feel like throwing up before answering the call.
The client that you lay awake the night before trying to figure out a way to avoid meeting with the next day.
The client that no matter what you do, no matter what HR heroics you pull off, will find something to beat you up for.

You feelin’ me?

As an HR professional, you’ll work with a lot of clients. Obviously, 95% of them will be terrific and won’t have horns or carry a pitchfork.

Here’s the point: One of the best things you’ll ever do for your HR career is to seek out and work with the Tonys of the world. There are lots of them out there — in all organizations, at all levels — from Warehouse Manager to CEO.

These clients are looking for great HR folks also. They want to partner with those who share and can help them realize their own visions for their organizations.

But make no mistake about it, clients like Tony are very demanding and won’t hesitate to kick you in the butt too…but in the process will also grow you, stretch you, challenge you, inspire you, nurture you and give you tough love along the way. And that’s what you want.

Now, having seen Tony, let’s get back to the original point of this article: What do you do to address clients from hell?  Two quick tips.

1. Avoid them in the first place.

When you’re interviewing for that new HR job, interview the company as hard as they are interviewing you. Ask insightful and tough questions to the business leader of the client group you’ll be supporting.

If the business leader or your main client is too busy to meet with you, that’s a big red flag.

And, again, a poor match will make your HR life a living hell. If you don’t know what to look for when interviewing your clients, it’s easy. You want to try and get as close to a Tony as you can.

2. If you’re already in a bad client relationship, start your exit strategy.

You want to pull the plug on this assignment ASAP. Your options: Transfer. Post for a new job. Have a candid discussion with your boss about another client or assignment. Leave the organization. Or offer to job swap with some other unsuspecting HR colleague (hey, just kidding!).

Either way, whatever you do, don’t fall in the trap of trying to fix this person. Research conducted by the Center For Creative Leadership reveals that trying to change your client is a waste of time – especially if they’ve been around awhile and their behavior has been tolerated. So stop wishing he or she will change and put your own needs first.

If your exit from this role is going to take some time, don’t be vindictive. Be patient and bide your time. Continue to give this jerk the same responsive, professional, value-added HR support that you always have. Just because you’re getting crapped on, is no excuse to return the favor.

However, don’t plan to stay in this role long. In volatile times with downsizing still occurring in many organizations, you never can tell how much weight this madman’s perceptions will be given in HR layoff decisions.

Let me be clear: the “personal development,” “character building” and the +5% compensation bribe…er, increase you might get to work with bad clients is overrated. It may sound great at the time, but isn’t worth it. Whatever you gain developmentally is offset by the hit you take to your HR reputation, your personal self-esteem and your mental sanity.

Life’s too short.

Avoid toxic clients at all costs.

You deserve better.

Onward!

Thứ Năm, 23 tháng 1, 2014

An employee relations manager is a person who addresses issues that affect the health of the workforce at a company. These issues include areas such as pay and interpersonal conflict. A person who wants to become an employee relations manager needs to complete a minimum of four years of college-level training, although two additional years of graduate school makes him or her even more attractive to employers. Getting practical experience is important for working in employee relations as a leader as well. Managers in the field must have solid communication skills and understand company policies thoroughly.

An individual who desires to become an employee relations manager should complete a four-year bachelor’s degree with a focus on an area such as human resource management or labor relations management. Enrolling in this type of program requires proof of a high school diploma or the equivalent certification, as well as a high school transcript. During the admissions process, you also should be prepared to provide results from recently completed standardized tests and fill out the required application to receive admission to your desired school.

Employee relations training programs feature classes on a wide variety of areas that affect the workers at a company on a regular basis. For instance, you will take courses on employee benefits and conflict resolution as well as grievance processes, which are designed to help employees to voice workplace concerns to their managers. An employment law class also is an important part of a program for someone who wishes to become an employee relations manager, as this type of class covers regional or national laws on topics such as discrimination during hiring along with disabilities.

Although a bachelor’s degree helps someone to get into the labor relations field, many companies prefer you to hold a master’s degree in the industry. A master’s degree program in an area such as labor relations, human resource management, or even business administration lasts two years and teaches you how to lead various initiatives to help employees to remain satisfied and well-equipped for their roles. While in this type of program, you will take advanced courses in areas including compensation, strategic staffing, and training.

Field experience is extremely critical for someone who wants to lead worker relations at a company. Many companies will not hire someone to become an employee relations manager if he or she does not have several years of experience working on various human resources or employee relations projects. For this reason, completing an internship in the field and starting out in an entry-level employee relations role is valuable for building industry experience.

Wisegeek.Com/how-do-i-become-an-employee-relations-manager.Htm